11 Facts About Women You May Have Forgotten

3 07 2012

It may seem that I am stating the obvious here, but judging by things I’ve heard recently a reminder may be in order.

Whether it’s Chris Evans saying that women are much better at making beds than men or a woman’s voice suddenly rising above the murmur on the bus, saying “well duuuh, all women love shoes”, everyone seems to have an opinion on what women are like.

Something I feel sums up society’s view of women is the range and positioning of women’s magazines in the supermarket. Generally the women’s magazines that are placed at the front, at eye level insinuate that women should be interested in: men, fashion, make-up, hair, dieting, weddings, babies, celebrities, keeping house etc. Magazines that deviate from these norms, eg Diva are placed on the top shelf at the back, somewhere on the border between the “Women’s” and “Angling” sections.

So, without further ado, here are a few things you may have forgotten about women:

Continued on the Huffington Post.

Advertisements




What Is Reality? Unplug Yourself and See

29 06 2012

Recently, I have been cycling to work and it has given me more of an opportunity to look at the other commuters then driving did.

I have noticed that the vast majority of them are plugged into some form of media, one way or another.Pedestrians and cyclists have headphones. Many of those in cars appear to be singing along or are laughing at what I presume to be the radio, although it is entirely possible that it’s the sight of my cycling attire that is tickling them. I suppose shorts, a neon cagoule and a pink and white scarf tied around my face does look a tad eccentric, especially when it’s raining. So far it has prevented me from being run over and reduced the amount of time spent sneezing upon arrival at work, so there is something to say for it.

I digress.

Perhaps my view of things is a little skewed, but it seems to me that people can’t have time to think. They are flooded with media.

Continued on the Huffington Post.





Why the Obsession With Competing?

11 07 2011

Up and down the country children and adults alike are fretting over school sports days. Sources of worry are diverse: will Jack be allowed to win every race again? Will Ruby’s trainers be up to scratch? Will Liam be able to stand the humiliation of losing? Are children being damaged by competitive sports days? Should there be a prize for everyone?

Our school Sports Day was firmly in the competitive camp. As a child, I was able to run at a perfectly reasonable speed unless it was a race, at which point I would go into slow motion, the ground would turn to treacle and I would barely be able to lift my legs. The notable exception to this was when racing my brother – a highly competitive and extremely undignified affair. Needless to say, I was last in every race at every Sports Day and Swimming Gala for my entire school career.

My parents were not amongst those who provided blue tack for the egg and spoon race or those who turned up with running spikes and mowed down Katie’s dad the year he was trampled in the fathers’ race, neither did they have me training for the sack race in the garden every night, while my mother looked on with a stop watch.

Read more on the Huffington Post…








%d bloggers like this: